Last month, I answered some questions about writing and wellness as part of Colleen Story’s interview series with authors. You can read the interview right here on her site.

I have to say, the process got me thinking. Writing and wellness. Not two words you’d necessarily put together. Apart from a little back pain and maybe the odd bout of RSI, the act of writing isn’t particularly physical.

But when you think about it – or when you have to answer interview questions – you realise there’s a lot more to it than that.

Writers sit for hours in front of a computer screen. We worry endlessly about whether everything we do is terrible. We have no idea if it will all be worth it in the end.

It’s a pretty stressful hobby with few immediate rewards. Think of other hobbies. If you go to the gym, you feel better right away. If you enjoy knitting, people might see the fruit of your labour the next day.

‘That’s a nice scarf.’ ‘Thank you. I made it last night.’

Writing is an never-ending process that involves lots of time alone in a frequent state of persuading yourself that your time – such precious time – is being well spent.

Lots of fun. Really healthy.

Writing and wellness is an interesting subject that we don’t talk about enough. I know that since having children, my writing process has totally changed and that’s mostly down to my health.

Not that I’m ill. I’m absolutely fine.

But I do get up at 6am every day, which means I can’t write well at night. I spend my weekend days with my boys, which means I’m not at my desk, like I would have been before.

I’ve learnt that as our lives change, so does our health and wellness, even if only a little. It affects our writing, but the trick is to adapt, do things differently, try and find new routines.

And that’s perfectly possible. People do it all the time.

Head to Colleen’s site to read the interview.